Perspectives in complementary and alternative medicine

Sub Title:

Author: Gareza, Balintawak S.

Accession Number: 1388D

Class No:

Author No: S

Copyright Year: 2010

Abstract:

This qualitative research in complementary and alternative medicine from the perspective of its practitioners and clients followed the three approaches for qualitative inquiry, namely: symbolic-interactionism, critical ethnography, and grounded- theory. The setting was in Bacolod City, the capital city of Negros Occidental. Multiple data gathering was done through interviews, field notes, artifacts, and rituals like clinic activities and therapeutic modalities. Fifteen informants were included: two medical practitioners, two clinic staff, three family members, and eight clients with various disease processes who underwent consults and treatments in the two complementary and alternative medicine clinics, For validity and reliability of data generated, verbal patterns, contrasts, excerpts from complementary and alternative medicine documents, photographs and significant information were gathered from complementary and alternative practitioners and clients. sampling method was through opportunities sampling. An interview schedule was formulated to guide the interview process. Significant findings derived from the study were as follows: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has for its philosophy, "science of treatment". This was the point of parting of ways between conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine. The treatment modalities in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) were: homotoxicology which dealt with detoxification or getting rid of metals stored in the body that caused many disease processes to include malignancy: utilized natural occuring bio-oxidatives like ozone and hydrogen peroxide, biopuncture, and autosanguis therapies to treat allergies and malignancies. The principles underlying these modalities are Burgi`s principle, Amdt-Schultze principle which proposed that weak stimuli stimulate life function, moderate string stimuli inhibit and strongest stimuli suspend life function, immunologic bystander reaction which includes the role of memory cells. However, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used the diagnostic tools in conventional medicine. In acute cases that needed hospitalization, as licensed practitioners conventional medicine protocol was followed and for chronic cases, complementary and alternative medicine procedures were applied. The scope of practitioner`s involvement included lifestyle, and spiritual, psychological, and environmental dimensions of the clients` life such as improved practitioner-client interaction; utilized chromotherapy (visual color) and verbal expression through music; prayer and meditation, instead if television viewing. Hence, it adhered to the holistic approach to treatment; better quality of life; the role of the immune system, its cleansing and nourishment emphasized in self- healing. Further, it followed the same pathophysiologic matrix of disease process in conventional medicine. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) revisited the cultural tradition of herbalism and other natural agents for treatment as the pharmacodynamic basis of homeophathic preparations. The reasons given as to the paradigmatic shift from conventional medicine to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among practitioners were adherence to the Hippocratic Oath as credentialed physicians that is , to explore alternative therapy to cure disease processes; likewise, an experience of frustration over a friend`s death for failure to arrest the disease process using the conventional approach. Clients` shift to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was the failure of conventional medicine to give relief complaints and the many side-effects of pharmaceutical drugs. As to the practitioners` significant experiences in their practice of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), their patients who strictly complied with all the treatment plans were the ones who experienced healing the most and several hospitalized acute and chronic cases getting healed. As to the socio-economic implications of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), there was the concern on the refusal of local hospitals to accept admission of clients under complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); the social stratification of medical practitioners in the local settings; zero accessibility of homeophatic preparations from local drugs stores; exportation of raw materials and machineries of the production of homeophatic preparations to Germany, and the high-priced importation of finished products, thus making health care unaffordable by the general public.


Keywords: Complementary and alternative medicine

Citation:



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