Consequence mapping as a strategy in teaching climate change

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Author: Arcenal, Mercy Laguardia.

Accession Number: 1566T

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Copyright Year: 2014

Abstract:

This quasi-experimental research method aimed at eliciting students' views on climate change causes, consequences, mitigation, and adaptation exposed to consequence mapping and lecture method. Seventy four students of a private school comprised the two treatments-consequence mapping and lecture method. Both sections were given the checklist on climate change causes, consequences, mitigation, and adaptation before and after the intervention. The experimental group-consequence mapping group was exposed to making consequence map as intervention. The statistical tools employed were frequency counts, percentage, and ranks for descriptive statistics; and Mann Whitney U for dependent samples and Wilcoxon Signed rank for independent samples for inferential statistics. The findings revealed after the intervention that the top cause of climate change is increased water vapor and carbon dioxide causes climate change; the top climate change consequences are storms, heat waves, floods, and expanded areas favorable to the growth of certain pests that can harm people directly and affect food production; the top climate change mitigation is using less electricity can mitigate climate change; and the top climate change adaptation is improved tillage practices can sequester carbon. No significant difference was found in the result before and after intervention existed between groups as to climate change causes, consequences, and mitigation. A significant difference was observed in adapting to climate change. A significant difference was also observed when students are classified as consequence mapping group and lecture method group before and after intervention as to climate change causes, consequences, mitigation, and adaptation. Consequence mapping and lecture method are more or less the same in eliciting students' views about climate change causes, consequences, mitigation and adaptation. However, there are ways in which consequence mapping is better than the lecture method. More spicifically, students learn how to do activities rather than memorize a collection of facts. They are given activities and lessons that involve them in observing, comparing, classifying, predicting, and inferring. In this connection, having consequence mapping as a strategy in eliciting climate change causes, consequences, mitigation, and adaptation would make a difference in students' views.


Keywords: Consequence mapping, teaching climate change

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