The Constructivist learning in the acquisition of written and oral communication skills

Sub Title:

Author: Abalayan, Nida L.

Accession Number: 1410D

Class No: 302.2

Author No: Ab16

Copyright Year: 2013

Abstract:

This quasi-experimental research aimed to ascertain the influence of the constructivist teaching model on the acquisition of the preschoolers' written and oral communication skills at Saint Mary's Academy of Capiz. Two prep classes were used as the participants. The constructivist teaching model group was made as the control group. The experimental study was conducted for a period of six weeks. To analyze the gathered data, means and standard deviations were used as descriptive statistics while the Mann Whitney U set at .05 alpha level was the inferential statistics. The results of the study showed that the pre intervention written communication skills as a whole and in terms of short and long vowel sounds of the pupils in both the conventional and constructivist teaching models were "high", except for the consonant blends and digraphs category for both groups, was "very high". The post intervention skills of the constructivist group were "very high" as a whole and according to vowel and consonant sounds, while the conventional group had "very high" level of skills as a whole and according to blends and digraphs but had only "high" skills when classified according to long and short vowel sounds. The pre and post intervention written communication skills in terms of the cognitive domain were "high" and "very high" respectively for both groups. However when categorized as to levels of cognitive domain, the pre intervention recall and application of both groups were "high" while their comprehension and analysis were "very high". The post intervention communication skills in all levels of the cognitive domain among the pupils in the conventional group remained in the same level as their pre intervention communication skill levels, while those pupils in the constructivist group attained a "very high" level of skills in all categories of the cognitive domain. The pre intervention oral communication skills as a whole and when categorized according to vowel and consonant sounds of the pupils in both groups were "high". However, the post intervention communication skills as a whole and according to categories among the pupils in the conventional group were "high" except for the vowel category which was "very high". Moreover, the constructivist group had "very high" post intervention written communication skills except for the category of short vowel sound which was only "high". There was a significant difference between the pre and post intervention and written communication skills as a whole and in short vowel sounds of the pupils in the conventional teaching model, but no significant difference existed in their skills in long vowel sounds and in consonant blends and digraphs. There were significant difference between the pre and post intervention and written communication skills in terms of cognitive domain as a whole and when categorized according to levels of recall, application and analysis of the pupils in the constructivist teaching model group. However, there was no significant difference in the level of their comprehension. No significant difference between the pre and post intervention written communication skills as a whole and when categorized according to the levels of recall, comprehension, application and analysis was noted among the pupils in the conventional teaching model group. There were significant differences between the pre and post oral communication skills of the pupils in terms of vowel and consonant sounds as a whole. Similarly, significant differences were also noted along the area of short vowel sounds, long vowel sounds, and consonant blends and digraphs in both the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups. There were no significant differences between the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups' post intervention written communication skills in terms of vowel and consonants sounds as a whole according to short vowel sounds, long vowel sounds, and consonant blends/digraphs. No significant differences existed between the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups' post intervention written communication skills in terms of cognitive domain as a whole and in the categories of recall, comprehension, application and analysis. No significant differences were noted between the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups' post intervention oral communication skills in terms of vowel and consonant sounds as a whole and according to short and long vowel sounds. However, significant differences existed in their consonant blends and digraphs. There were no significant differences in the mean gain in written oral communication skills in terms of vowel and consonant sounds as a whole and according to short vowel sounds, long vowel sounds and consonant blends/digraphs between the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups. No significant differences were also noted in the mean gain between the conventional and constructivist teaching model groups' written communication skills in terms of cognitive domain as a whole and in terms of the levels of their comprehension, application and analysis. However, significant differences existed in the cognitive level of recall in favor of the conventional teaching model group. There were significant differences in the mean gain between the conventional and constructivist teaching models oral communication skills as a whole and in long vowel sounds in favor of the contructivist teaching model group.


Keywords: constructivist learning

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